Hammered: Memoir of an Addict trailer on YouTube

A trailer created in Windows Live Movie Maker, with photography and music by Matthew Revert.

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Purity | Kaaron Warren

‘Therese was clean on the inside, but her mud-slapped, filthy, stinking home – with its stacks of newspapers going back as far as she was born, spoons bent and burnt, food grown hard and crusty – kept her skin dirty.

from “Purity” in The Gate Theory

This story first appeared in the anthology Scenes from the Second Storey, edited by Amanda Pillar for Morrigan Books. It’s a gorgeous concept; each writer was asked to write a song inspired by the album of the same name by The God Machine. My story was Purity.

At the same time, I became fascinated with the sort of hysteria that leads whole towns to dance or laugh for days, sometimes to the point of death. What is it in us that causes us to follow blindly sometimes? When I saw an old man in a supermarket (I’m often inspired by the things I see in the supermarket queue!) who was dressed beautifully but was wearing a baseball cap that seemed to be leaking blood, I knew I had my cult leader.’

via Purity | Kaaron Warren.

Telling Yourself the Story (to the End)…

Have you ever been writing and everything is coming along smoothly until…it isn’t? Some people might call it writer’s block, but I don’t actually think writer’s block is a thing. There are, of course, many reasons someone might be unable to write, including depression/emotional issues, lack of time, etc. but when “writer’s block” means “I don’t know how to proceed forward,” then I have a few tips.

I am one of the rare people who finds beginnings and middles fairly easy to write, but endings? Endings are the bane of my existence. I generally know what the ending ought to be, but how to get from the middles I’ve written to the words The End is something I find myself having to sit down and think through again and again. For me, this “roadblock” generally happens around 60,000 words.

via Telling Yourself the Story.

Making Mistakes in drafts…

“First drafts never come easy. They rarely turn out exactly how you’ve planned them, if you’ve even planned them at all. The other day, fellow pantser and Pub Crawler JJ posted about endings being one of the most challenging things for her, and offered useful advice on how she deals with the inevitable wall blocking her way to the goal.I’m the total opposite. I always know my endings. I know from the start how everything will turn out, which characters, if any, will die, and what kind of world order will be in place. If I don’t, then I have no will to write. I can have the perfect world constructed, but if I don’t have an ending to suit a story, I may as well have never created it.”

via Exploring Mistakes.