Author tips: A synopsis writing masterclass | Harper Impulse

From AUTHOR TIPS:

A few weeks ago we asked the writers on our Facebook page what they’d like some advice on. We have already had our master copywriter Ben North give out some tips on writing short copy, and now here’s our wonderful publisher Kim Young with some advice for writing your synopsis

via Author tips: A synopsis writing masterclass | Harper Impulse.

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News|Small publishers, big opportunities|feature|195774|artsHub Australia

Many authors dream of signing an huge multi-book deal with a large publisher. But big is not always the best option.

While using a small publisher is often seen as a consolation prize, it can be a tailored experience that allows you to publish what you want for whom you want.

The exact extent of the Australian independent publishing market is hard to estimate. Mary Masters, General Manager of The Small Press Network (SPUNC), a representative group for small and independent Australian publishers says, ‘We currently have 130 core members who come in all shapes and sizes and we also have some NZ members. While our current membership is representative of the breadth of publishing that our sector has to offer, it is by no means comprehensive of the publishers that exist.’

Many small independent publishers cover niche topics such as crime, erotica or poetry. While this specialisation of content allows for unique publications, it can limit sales.

READ MORE via News|Small publishers, big opportunities|feature|195774|artsHub Australia.

Apple argues diverse book publisher contracts prove non-collusion in DOJ suit

A U.S. government lawyer opened a civil trial by portraying Apple as a corporate bully that swaggered into the market for electronic books in 2010, forcing an end to price competition and costing consumers hundreds of millions of dollars.

The Justice Department attorney, Lawrence Buterman, said Monday a dramatic price increase in e-books was “no accident or unforeseen outcome” but the result of a deliberate plan by Apple and five book publishers to eliminate Seattle-based Amazon.com’s $9.99 bargain price for popular e-books.

He asked U.S. District Judge Denise Cote, who is overseeing a trial expected to last several weeks, to find that the computer company had violated anti-trust laws. 

Via: http://www.dailyfinance.com/2013/06/04/apple-trial-ebook-prices-publishers/

Defending itself from U.S. Department of Justice allegations of e-book price fixing, Apple on Tuesday pointed to the diverse contract terms it made with five major publishing houses as evidence against purported conspiracy.

A follow-up report to yesterday’s proceedings from AllThingsD says Apple lawyer Orin Snyder brought up the negotiated terms multiple times during the bench trial now in front of U.S. District Court Judge Denise Cote.

The composition of Apple’s agreements with five of the biggest book publishers in the world is central to the Justice Department’s antitrust argument, which holds that the companies worked hand-in-hand to falsely inflate e-book prices in the iBookstore. At the core of Apple’s pricing strategy was a so-called “most favored nations” clause that allows publishers to set e-book pricing, but precludes them from selling the same content to other retailers at a lower price.

via: Apple argues diverse book publisher contracts prove non-collusion in DOJ suit.

Here is the DoJ opening statement (June 3, 2013):

http://www.documentcloud.org/documents/706511-doj-opening-powerpoint.html#document/p1

Author Discovery Tip of the Week: Promote your Editor! – Authordiscovery.com

 

“It’s not just the $.99-$2.99 price point and Free e-book specials that have the traditional publishing establishment worried. It’s the .99 cent e-book with the terrible cover and the typos, grammatical errors, and poor story development that have them concerned. If readers are willing to buy these types of books, then traditional publishing truly is lost.”

Read more via Author Discovery Tip of the Week: Promote your Editor! – Authordiscovery.com.

The Alliance of Independent Authors Welcomes Legal Action Against Author Solutions and Penguin | Successful Self-Publishing. The Alliance of Independent Authors’s Blog.

No surprise, really. ASI have one of the worst reputations in the publishing world, yet for some reason, authors keep going to them.

EXTRACT:

“The Alliance of Independent Authors welcomes the news that three authors have filed suit against self-publishing service provider Author Solutions (ASI), and its parent company Penguin.

Law firm Giskan & Solotaroff, on April 26, filed a class action complaint on behalf of writers Kelvin James, Jodi Foster, and Terry Hardy. The complaints listed in the action won’t come as any surprise to those who follow the behaviour of ASI in recent times: overcharging for services, up-selling editing and marketing packages of poor quality, deceptive practices,  poor royalty reporting and nonpayment of monies due. (For a full list of ASI iniquities, see this earlier post.)

The company’s true business is not publishing, the complaint stresses, but selling services to authors. And not doing it well. As we point out in our recent book, ASI is a company about whom we regularly receive the most complaints from a wide variety of authors.”

Read more via The Alliance of Independent Authors Welcomes Legal Action Against Author Solutions and Penguin | Successful Self-Publishing. The Alliance of Independent Authors’s Blog..

Competition time:…

Courtesy of Crystal Lake Publishing, who release a new anthology on Monday which contains one of my short stories:

Competition time: to win print and eBook copies of future releases like Fear the Reaper, Children of the Grave or The Outsiders, follow the link to the website and subscribe to the newsletter.
http://www.crystallakepub.com/contact-us.php

via Competition time:….

Warning of piracy in France

Warning to any and all writers who’ve had a story published in France.
The Bibliothèque Nationale de France (BNF) has launched a doubtful venture reminiscent of the one Google tried to launch a few years ago. They’ve decided that if a book published in the 20th century is out of print, they have a right to publish it as an ebook and reap the profits (a pittance is due to the original publisher, and, oh, yeah, to the author, too). Despite the protests of French writers, the thing has been launched this week, with the creation of a website featuring a database of approx. 60,000 books liable to get the pirate ebook treatment (State approved, that is) unless the author or legal representative files a formal complaint.
Yeah, you say, but this is only for French writers, right?
Wrong.
They’ve done such a botched job listing the books they feel they can steal that they’ve included anthologies edited by French editors but featuring British and American writers.
A case in point: “De sang et d’encre“, edited by Léa Silhol and published by Naturellement in 1999 (the publisher has gone bankrupt since). With stories by Neil Gaiman, Chelsea Quinn Yarbro, Lawrence Schimel, Brian Stableford, Brian Lumley, Charles de Lint, S. P. Somtow, Brian Hodge, Nancy Kilpatrick, Nancy Holder, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Freda Warrington, Bob Weinberg.
Writers, check out the site and contact your agent to put a stop to this act of piracy.
You have six months to act.

More info here (French): http://relire.bnf.fr/projet-relire-cadre-legal

~Courtesy of Scott M. Goriscak